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Campaign launch “Fake News: A Public Art Intervention”

Today the launch of the campaign “Fake News: A Public Art Intervention,” an initiative by KULTURFORMAT and Peter Baldinger in cooperation with Mozarthaus Vienna, a member of Wien Holding, will take place at Mozarthaus Vienna. To mark the opening of the poster campaign by KULTURFORMAT and the Austrian visual artist Peter Baldinger entitled “Fake Art: A Public Art Intervention,” the first large-scale subject will be presented on the façade of Mozarthaus Vienna at Domgasse 5. This and three further subjects will then be seen on advertising columns throughout Vienna.

Campaign motivation

Peter Baldinger has been working since 2017 on the picture series “Fake News.” As a former journalist, he has been involved for several years with digital imaging technology and the power of the media. The term fake news, which suggest a deliberate attempt to deceive, has come to the fore in the last two years to become an essential element of media and political discourse and everyday life. Baldinger’s campaign looks at the way in which fake news is perceived and interpreted.

Baldinger uses the public space as a platform for the visual communication of his pixelated images of couples familiar to us from magazines and the Internet. He blurs his protagonists and the superimposed words “Fake News” to the point of abstraction. The subjects recall the advertising and magazine ethic that deliberately turns subjective perception into an objective “reality.” It is only on closer inspection that the deception, possibly intentional, comes to light.

„Fake News“ in Mozart’s day

Mozarthaus Vienna, Mozart’s only surviving place of abode in Vienna, sees itself not only as a venue for a comprehensive presentation of the dynamic period the composer spent in Vienna at the highpoint of his creativity, but also as a place of artistic and discursive encounter. Vienna in Mozart’s day was a center of the European Enlightenment concept, discussed from many aspects and expressed particularly clearly in Mozart’s music.

Even then, the spotlighting of false news would have revealed how the works of less prominent composers were attributed to Mozart so as to draw attention to and sell them. This phenomenon is currently investigated at Mozarthaus Vienna in the special exhibition “Mozart on the way to Immortality. Genius and Posterity” an exhibition compiled from the Austrian National Library in the Mozarthaus Vienna. The museum’s cooperation with KULTURFORMAT and the artist Peter Baldinger places these historical occurrences in the context of the present-day discussion of fake news.

Further information about the individual images in this campaign can be found at www.aufloesung.at


Opening of the special exhibition of the Austrian National Library in the Mozarthaus Vienna
"Mozart on the way to immortality. Genius and Posterity" 16 February 2018 to 27 January 2019

On the 15 February 2018 the Mozarthaus Vienna opened the new special exhibition compiled from the Austrian National Library "Mozart on the way to immortality. Genius and Posterity" with noumerous invited guests.

After welcome greetings from Peter Hanke, Director Wien Holding, and Gerhard Vitek, Director Mozarthaus Vienna, Thomas Leibnitz, Director of the Department of Music, gave an introduction to the special exhibition which he curated with his collegue Andrea Harrandt. The aim of this exhibition is to show this process of how people became aware of Mozart’s greatness and make it possible to experience and comprehend the unbroken, indeed increased popularity of his oeuvre after his death on the basis of a variety of aspects.

The ceremonial opening from Johanna Rachinger, General Director Austrian National Library, and the musical contributions by pianist Kristin Okerlund and soprano Andrea Carroll completed this successfull evening.

Mozart on the way to immortality. Genius and Posterity
An exhibition compiled from the Austrian National Library in the Mozarthaus Vienna until 27 January 2019

Mozart – the name stands for musical perfection and for an outstanding genius.  Yet how did Mozart become world famous and how did his fame spread?  Poems, homages, work editions, legends – this all formed the image of Mozart after the premature death of the composer. This exhibition is mounted by the Austrian National Library in the Mozarthaus Vienna and presents exceptional objects from its collections, including the autograph manuscript of Frédéric Chopin’s Variations on ‘Là ci darem la mano’ from Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni, on display to the public for the first time.

During his lifetime Mozart had in some cases been awarded the status of the extraordinary, especially by his great contemporary Joseph Haydn. It was Haydn who, in 1785, said to Mozart’s father Leopold that his son was “the greatest composer I know in person and by name” and in a letter dated December 20, 1791, shortly after Mozart’s death, Haydn wrote to Marianne von Genzinger, “Not in a hundred years will posterity again see such talent.”

On October 29, 1792, Ferdinand Graf Waldstein wrote in the album of the young Ludwig van Beethoven, who was about to set off for Vienna, “Mozart’s genius is still grieving and lamenting the death of his pupil. [...] By constant diligence you will receive Mozart’s spirit from Haydn’s hands.”

The aim of this exhibition is to show this process of how people became aware of Mozart’s greatness and make it possible to experience and comprehend the unbroken, indeed increased popularity of his oeuvre after his death on the basis of a variety of aspects.

The curators: Andrea Harrandt and Thomas Leibnitz

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